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The Weekly Might Have Missed List (10/05/08)

Maniactive: Top 6 Touchy-Feely Presentation Rehearsal Tips — “2. Wear Your Shoes. Oh, they don’t call it “dress” rehearsal for nothing! Don’t rehearse in your pajamas — unless you intend to give your presentation in your jammies ! Instead, rehearse in the actual clothes you’ll be wearing during your presentation — right down to your shoes. You’ll be amazed at how much better your performance will be just by understanding how your entire body feels in full ‘costume and makeup.'”

©iStockphoto.com/DaydreamsGirl

©iStockphoto.com/DaydreamsGirl

Work•Play•Experience: How not to close a presentation… (A true story) — “I experienced this live and in terrifying Stampede-o-rama last week, exactly as described above. As soon as the word “buffet” was out, jackets were being grabbed, chairs were scraping and conversation had started. What followed was not just drowned out, it was ignored by 100 lizard brains who could already smell the steaming flesh.”

Great Public Speaking: Check Local References — “On the international speaking tour I just returned from I could have made a serious flaw had I not checked out material with the locals after I got in the country. Apparently one country hates a certain kind of animal to the point where some natives actually try to run over the animal when driving on the road. A nearby country loves the same animal.”

Speak Schmeak: Another reason to avoid the lectern — “Did you see how high John McCain had to raise his arms for his gestures to be seen over the top of his lectern? He seemed uncomfortable having to use exaggerated arm movements (which were reenacted in the SNL skit the following night).” and Don’t go on a juice fast before a big appearance — “Don’t try anything new right before a presentation. It might throw you off, just a little.”

SpeakerSue Says: How to pick yourself up after you fall — “I was so bad, so awful, that I couldn’t make eye contact with anyone as I left the stage. (This wasn’t that big a deal really because no one was making eye contact with me either.) We all wanted me to exit the room as quickly as possible.”

The Humble Nailbanger: Life in the dark — “Never before, however, have I done what I did the other day, which was make it all the way to work and halfway through the day before realizing that I was wearing a button-down shirt inside out. The collar was up the way it should have been, but the buttons were on the inside, tags hanging out, the whole gigantic embarassing bit.”

The Charleston Gazette: Behind the curtain with stagehand Joey Ansel — “Stagecraft is taught in colleges, but Ansel says he learned his trade on the job. None of what he does, he says, is extremely complicated. ‘It’s a lot of little things.’ It’s important to be organized and able to remain calm. He says it helps to be open to change. Each show has its own set of concerns and issues. He can’t rely on everything working the way it’s always worked or even people behaving the way they did last time.”

Encore Design Group: Podium or Lectern? — “The word ‘podium’ is one of the most misused terms in the public assembly world. It is common to hear this word misused in church, government, auditoria, and schools. The proper use of terms is one way of separating the professionals from the rest.”

9 comments to The Weekly Might Have Missed List (10/05/08)

  • Aha! Someone else who's trying to clarify “podium” vs. “lectern!” Unfortunately, they don't seem to take comments on their blog. I was going to give them a thumbs up for that one.

  • Hi Lisa. I have to admit that I've been lazy and tend to use the terms interchangeably. Now that I've been put on notice that some folks might see this as a way to measure of professional credibility, I think I'll be a lot more careful.

  • I'll be watching you, Lee! ;-)

  • Graeme

    “Check local references”- That'll be the possum in Australia and New Zealand then? That's the kind of reference I like to play with in presentations. I live in Australia and sometimes present in NZ (or to audiences from NZ) and playing on the differences between the more or less identical cultures can be a great way of lightening the mood. There's a lot of friendly rivalry between the two.

  • Hi Graeme, tahts for stopping by and added to the conversation. Has there ever been a time when “playing on the differences” didn't go quite the way you had hoped it would? The problem with things that work really well is that sometimes they can work really, really badly.

  • Graeme

    “Check local references”- That'll be the possum in Australia and New Zealand then? That's the kind of reference I like to play with in presentations. I live in Australia and sometimes present in NZ (or to audiences from NZ) and playing on the differences between the more or less identical cultures can be a great way of lightening the mood. There's a lot of friendly rivalry between the two.

  • Hi Graeme, thanks for stopping by and adding to the conversation. Has there ever been a time when “playing on the differences” didn't go quite the way you had hoped it would? The problem with things that work really well is that sometimes they can work really, really badly.

  • Graeme

    “Check local references”- That'll be the possum in Australia and New Zealand then? That's the kind of reference I like to play with in presentations. I live in Australia and sometimes present in NZ (or to audiences from NZ) and playing on the differences between the more or less identical cultures can be a great way of lightening the mood. There's a lot of friendly rivalry between the two.

  • Hi Graeme, thanks for stopping by and adding to the conversation. Has there ever been a time when “playing on the differences” didn't go quite the way you had hoped it would? The problem with things that work really well is that sometimes they can work really, really badly.

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